AHLA Offers Practical Toolkit For Managing Healthcare Conflicts

     Before you head off for the long Thanksgiving weekend, consider signing up for a teleconference to be held next Tuesday that you might otherwise miss in the post holiday crush.  The American Health Lawyers Association ("AHLA"), through its ADR Task Force, is offering "A Practical Toolkit for Managing Healthcare Conflict" from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time on December 2, 2008.  You can read the full description of the program and sign up on the AHLA's website.  It is open to AHLA members and non-members.

      Presumably, the teleconference will be based on the "Practical Toolkit for Managing Healthcare Conflict" just published by the AHLA, which is available as a PDF on the AHLA website.  This document is a good summary of the need for conflict management in the healthcare (particularly hospital) setting, and provides a framework for hospital management to approach conflict management comprehensively.  It also addresses the specific requirements for internal hospital conflict resolution processes mandated by the Joint Commission.

       

     No doubt the current economic crisis affecting hospitals in New Jersey and throughout the country  will only make conflict more prevalent and important to manage.  It will be interesting to see whether some of the suggestions made in the AHLA's toolkit, which will carry a new and significant price tag, will gain traction.  I believe what they say about "an ounce of prevention" applies here, but those with the checkbooks may need more convincing. 

     Joining in to hear this program would be a step in the right direction.

 

[Image: A toolbox, by Per Erik Standberg, May 13, 2006] 

Werner Institute To Host Health Care Conference

        
         [Image: Omaha jazz great Lewis "Luigi" Waites plays the vibraphone during a tribute to Duke Ellington, July 29, 1999, Photo by Jim Williams, for "Joselyn Art Museum: Jazz on the Green," a Nebraska Local Legacies project]




         I just heard from Debra Gerardi, Chair of the Program on Healthcare Collaboration and Conflict Resolution at the Werner Institute for Negotiation and Dispute Resolution at Creighton University.  Debra alerted me to an upcoming program at the Werner Institute that should be considered by anyone interested in healthcare dispute resolution.  Creating Cultures of Engagement in Health Care - International Conference and Dialogue: New Models for Addressing Conflict, Disruption and Avoidance in Health Care, will be held at Creighton in Omaha on June 3-5, 2008.

        As stated in the program description on the Werner Institute's website, the purpose of the conference is to provide participants with an opportunity to:
  1. Learn how to apply principles and practices from the field of dispute resolution to upcoming mandates for change including the new 2009 JCAHO leadership standards related to disruptive behavior and conflict management;
  2. Learn the principles guiding conflict resolution practice in health care including the essential components for conflict management training programs;
  3. Working with experts in health care mediation, negotiation and collaborative law, create an action plan for advancing the outcomes of the conference dialogues and create an ongoing community of experts.
       A description of the Conference's Premises makes it clear that the Werner Institute is on the mark with this program in matching a discussion of conflict resolution theory with an examination of the current culture of healthcare delivery.  And you can check out Luigi while you're there.

       Thanks again, Debra! 

Healthcare Conflicts Appropriate For ADR

                                    

           [Image: Cliffs of Moher, Ireland, Photo by Tobias Helfrich, March 27, 2004]


          The range of conflicts arising within the healthcare industry that could benefit from the application of an alternative dispute resolution process is as broad as one’s imagination.  This is a partial list of the circumstances in which conflicts can arise and ADR can be used effectively.

  • Contracts between hospitals, physicians and other providers for professional services  (conflicts arising in their formation, operation, renewal or termination)
  • Contracts with vendors (conflicts arising in their formation, operation, renewal or termination)
  • Joint venture agreements (conflicts arising in their formation, operation or termination)
  • Medical staff relations (conflicts arising in interpretation or amendment of bylaws, inter-department issues or clinical policies)
  • Medical staff privileges (conflicts arising in individual applications or disciplinary matters)
  • Managed care agreements (conflicts arising in their formation, operation, renewal or termination)
  • Disposition of financially distressed facilities (conflicts involving creditors, government regulators, staff and community)
  • Inter-institutional affiliations, mergers and acquisitions (conflicts arising in their formation, operation or termination)
  • Physician practice acquisitions (conflicts arising in their negotiation or unwinding)
  • Governance matters (intra-corporate board conflicts, including conflicts concerning management  performance or bylaws revisions)
  • Patient relations (conflicts arising in consent to treatment, quality of care, medical errors, billing and collection matters)
  • Governmental regulation (conflicts arising in licensing, compliance or enforcement matters)
  • Employment issues (conflicts arising in employee discipline or termination)
  • Professional practices (conflicts arising in their formation, entry of new partners, withdrawal of partners, retirement or dissolution)

Why ADR Works In Healthcare, Reason #1

          Alternative dispute resolution (or “ADR”) is increasingly being used to resolve conflicts arising in all facets of society.  The chief benefits of ADR (cost savings, faster results, confidentiality, and the parties’ control of the process) have been well established.  ADR is particularly appropriate for use in the healthcare industry for several additional reasons, the first of which is described today:


[Image: Table 10 from Gilbert Beckett, A Comic History of Rome  c. 1850, Cicero denouncing Cataline]


Reason #1. 

          The parties to a healthcare dispute often have some interest in (or need for) a continuing relationship after the current dispute is resolved.  By its nature, traditional litigation is an adversarial and combative process.  The objective of each party’s counsel is to crush the other party’s case, and in the process, the other party is often hurt as well (if not destroyed).  In contrast, although ADR involves advocacy of both sides of the conflict, the parties have jointly committed to a process of their choosing to reach a fair result that both will accept.  The likelihood of a viable relationship after resolution of the dispute is thus vastly improved.

          Examples of this advantage of ADR could occur with respect to the relationships between a hospital and members of its medical staff; partners to a healthcare joint venture; members of a professional practice; health providers and their patients; and health insurers and health providers. Because the need for healthcare services continues to grow, and there are a limited number of established participants in the delivery of (and payment for) those services, there is a significant incentive in many disputes for both parties to put their conflict behind them.


Starting a blog on Healthcare ADR

         
[Image: Musher Thomas Knolmayer at the Willow, Alaska start point of the 2005 Iditarod sled dog race, Photo by Tech. Sgt. Keith Brown]


          With this post, I start my first blog and what I think is the only blog site devoted to the topic of alternative dispute resolution in the healthcare industry.   As stated above on the masthead, I intend to blog at the intersection of ADR and healthcare law.  Both of these topics are well covered separately elsewhere (see links and blogs in sidebar), and I will try not to duplicate those efforts. 

          To make this site most useful, and to bring some order to my thoughts, I am dividing the world of ADR For The Healthcare Industry into topics that make sense to consider separately.  In alphabetical order, this blog will discuss alternative dispute resolution in the context of:

Commercial Healthcare Disputes

End of Life and Treatment Decisions

Healthcare Arbitration

Healthcare Mediation

Healthcare Regulatory Actions

Hospitals, Physicians and Medical Staffs

Managed Care Payment and Coverage Issues

Medical Malpractice Claims

These topics will overlap, and undoubtedly will subdivide and recombine over time.  But this is where I will start.  Let me know what you think.